A no man's land
© Carlos Ayesta - Guillaume Bression
© Carlos Ayesta - Guillaume Bression

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© Carlos Ayesta - Guillaume Bression
© Carlos Ayesta - Guillaume Bression

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© Carlos Ayesta - Guillaume Bression
© Carlos Ayesta - Guillaume Bression

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© Carlos Ayesta - Guillaume Bression
© Carlos Ayesta - Guillaume Bression

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The 1,000 square kilometers of land comprising the no-go zone around the Fukushima plant represent the most impressive, and most brutal, evidence of the nuclear accident. More than 80,000 people had to pack a few belongings and follow orders to evacuate, while others, fearful of radiation, left of their own volition, bequeathing ghost towns, almost devoid of light. Time has stood still.

We went inside the no-go zone to examine those landscapes from a fresh perspective; using flashlights to illuminate the empty streets at night. This allowed us to select our viewpoint and decide which countryside buildings or features to bring into sharp relief.

But instead of bringing these areas to life, the artificial lights highlight their desolation and exacerbate the sense of unease we felt standing amid these lost territories.